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20131028
20131105
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CNBC 21
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English 39
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
, and they'll provide the same benefit to the environment as over 60,000 trees. that's a trend we can all get behind. lou: you remember the "cash for clunkers" stimulus program, a new report on that program, shows that was a lemon according to brookings instruction, the program approved in 2009, did very little to help the environment. it cut gas consum contion by at, what we consume in 8 days, and cost for job created, came in at staggering $1.4 million per job. turning to the food stamp program, nearly 48 million americans who receive food stamps are set to see a cut in their benefits beginning tomorrow. those cuts amount to 6% of $ 80 billion damage, that means a family of 4 will receive abouts there are lik$36 less each mont. >> our next guest has been a combat surgeon who served in iraq, his constituent in ohio till him either their insurance rating are going higher or their policies are being canceled, contrary to what the had the is saying, joining us congressman brad wenstrup. he also serves on the house armied services committee, congressman great to have you with us, one of the impa
if you go after one you go after all, the people who provided that environment. >> i wrote a book called sell out, in 2009, about how -- listen, bubbles are not created by wall street, they are incentives that wall street is -- one of those incentives, prodding the barges to make the loans. neil: the flip side, those folks saying that jamie dimon could have said no. >> i think what hank paulson calls you in the room,. neil: former treasury secretary. >> tim geithner, the top regulator of the banks, when that comes in, you -- they say we would like you to do it, do you it. neil: the goal to me is paying fannie anything, that is what -- >> it is bogus, and absurd. it is so upsetting, the irony, 5 years after the financial crisis, fannie and freddie that helped cause this official crisis, they are getting money from one of the banks, j.p. morgan, which avoided a financial crisis, not saying they are perfect but in terms of risk management they were the best, one of the banks that caused financial crisis citigroup, was a place where jack lew worked. collected $8 million check before he becam
they need to focus on. you don't raise taxes in an environment where you need to grow the economy faster than it's already growing. >> adam, they look at that record amount of revenue and realize by raising taxes you get more revenue in the near term. so you're for that, get more revenue, right? >> well, first of all, we're sort of doing a disservice in just showing the revenue as an absolute number. it's only interesting or relevant in comparison with what our expenses are. that's how a business would look at it, how the government would look at it. and it has to be on table. that's what pelosi said. >> remember during the shutdown, there's no room to cut? remember that harry reid said in the senate, americans are all for raising taxes? they like the idea of raising taxes in this environment in there's a cluelessness as to what's going on. yeah, you can argue that the percentage of gdp, you should be raising more taxes. but come on, when is enough enough? >> i don't think that anyone wants to raise taxes. >> they just want to raise taxes on rich people. >> let him make his point. >> my
'll provide the same benefit to the environment as over 60,000 trees. that's a trend we can all get behind. the ocean gets warmer. the peruvian anchovy harvest suffers. it raises the price of fishmeal, cattle feed and beef. bny mellon turns insights like these into powerful investment strategies. for a university endowment. it funds a marine biologist... who studies the peruvian anchovy. invested in the world. bny mellon. ♪ i always feel like somebody's watching me ♪ >>> gas prices are hitting new lows. what does it all mean for the consumer? let's bring in david dillon, chairman and ceo of kroegger, t nation's largest grocery store chain. mr. dillon, this food stamps thing kind of snuck up on everybody. what will be the impact really? >> the impact is significant to the customers who rely on food stamps to pay for their food. after all, that's an obvious necessity. at kroger, we don't expect the impact to be significant. so much so that we confirmed our guidance for sales and earnings yesterday for the rest of this year and that's with the full knowledge of what we think will happen w
, and frankly, we're managing the company much more for a stable, consistent environment. and i would say that march to may period was a little unusual. >> i see. so if you took that out, you would see a much more smooth trend? >> absolutely. and so i think that's really important to get perspective. i think where our stock is now and with the interest rates that we still can borrow at, we can make a lot of hay at ventas. >> in the most recent quarter, we saw you bought $1.2 billion of properties and if i'm right about this, explain it, the yield 6.3% before gaap, that means theoretically to me, your board can think, you know what, we can raise the yield, raise the dividend right off this. >> absolutely. you raise the right point. we bought $1.3 billion in assets, gaap yields about 7.3% and we borrowed for 12 1/2 years up 3%. as i said with our metrics, i think there's still a very constructive investment environment and we grow cash flows internally and through external growth, which in turn allow us to raise the dividend at significant levels. >> okay. now there are people who say, jim,
the environment and what's going on, with the environment as it relates to health care and we'll make more decisions on that as we go forward. but as it relates to part-time teamer, this year we heard loudly from our team last year that they want more hours. we've been focused as we look at holiday staffing plans about providing more hours to our team if they want them. and we continue -- we're going to still hire 70,000 team members this holiday season to help us with the great sales we expect to do. but our first priority is providing all the hours that our team members want. >> john, you mentioned consumer spending, which you mentioned consumer spending which has been fragile. it could take another hit this friday when the food stamp benefit expires. some analysts say that could take as much as $16 billion of spending out of the economy and hurt target, walmart, other retailers that fend on some dep. how are you prepared and what sort of impact do you think it will have? >> there's clearly an impact there. our role -- our -- the food offering for us plays a little bit different role tha
. multiply that across over a thousand locations, and they'll provide the same benefit to the environment as over 60,000 trees. that's a trend we can all get behind. she loves to shop online with her debit card. and so does bill, an identity thief who stole mary's identity, took over her bank accounts and stole her hard earned money. unfortunately, millions of americans just like you learn all it may take is a little misplaced information to wreak havoc on your life. this is identity theft, and no one helps stop it better than lifelock. if mary had lifelock's bank account alerts, she could have been notified in time to help stop it. lifelock has the most comprehensive identity theft protection available, guarding your social security number, your money, your credit, even the equity in your home. you even get a $1 million service guarantee. that's security no one can beat. don't wait until you become the next victim! call the number on your screen and use promo code notme for 60 days of lifelock identity theft protection and get a document shredder free. call the number on your screen or g
a thousand locations, and they'll provide the same benefit to the environment as over 60,000 trees. that's a trend we can all get behind. >> senator jeff sessions today announcing that the department of health and human services quietly dropped a no-bid contract that would have promoted obamacare to prisoners, this condition cancellation aftr sessions asked hhs why they chose to create a special program for prisoners when they spent certain million on -- $ 70s million on so-called obama navigators for everyone. they pointed to a community add vo cassie organization, based in chicago, it appears daylight, is still an ant septic for all sorts of things. >> first obama administration toivonennintestify, before a hoe committee apologized, then maintained sim is working. -- system is working. the head. the centers for medicare and medicaid services construct what is the very least an alternative universe. >> we have a system that is working, we'll improve the speed of that system. >> excuse me. -- >> yes. >> you are saying the system right now is working? >> i'm saying it is working, it is ju
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, valuations are slightly extended in the current economic environment. go to cnbc.com and look at all the results and the stories we've written there. coming up, we'll have the economic outlook of this group and the outlook of how janet yellen will change the fed as we know it. >> for many of those people, they may not believe in the rally but they have to sit in it surely. >> many do not think it's going to work, do not think it's going to stay. i don't understand why they haven't increased their equity outlook with their expectations for the federal reserve, though those things certainly have gone hand in glove. >> for the moment, steve, thank you very much. steve liesman at hq. puerto rico is in a debt crisis. but why should you care? well, you might well own the country's troubled debt even if you don't know it. 180 mutual funds and combined $100 billion in assets have exposure now to puerto rico. should you be worried? david faber thinks so. listen to him after the break. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite
to the environment as over 60,000 trees. that's a trend we can all get behind. and this park is the inside of your body. see, the special psyllium fir in metamucil actually gels to trap some carbs to help maintain healthy blood sugar levels. metamucil. 3 amazing benefits in 1 super fiber. he one our breaking news conference continues. with the health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius. the administration at best or worst lie to the american people about what people have a source insurance plans though. dagen: at the big picture is it was a botched rollout. we will speak with greg harper from this committee and we have all of that coming up next. [ male announcer ] what if a small company became big business overnight? ♪ like, really big... then expanded? ♪ or their new product tanked? ♪ or not? what if they embrace new technology instead? ♪ imagine a company's future with the future of trading. company profile. a research tool on thinkorswim. from td ameritrade. a research tool on thinkorswim. help the gulf when we made recover and learn the gulf, bp from what happened so we co
the same benefit to the environment as over 60,000 trees. that's a trend we can all get behind. >>> all day long we've been looking at companies with sky high earnings ratio merit this price investors are paying for their stocks. dominic chu looks at two more stocks on his list. >> let's look at metlife, because this particular company, you can see, has been on a tear over the course of the past year. the shares are up and they've been up quite a bit. now, the real question for shares of metlife, you can see they're up about 40% so far over the past year. can metlife sustain those valuations? well, the good story for metlife, a life insurance company, a retirement company, is that the overseas life insurance business is good, growing, robust. they bought a big chunk from aig at one point. the bad part of the story here is that we continue to be in low interest rate environments here throughout the course of the u.s. and in europe. they're not able to generate the kinds of returns that they have in the past. and it all leads to a valuation, priced earnings ratio of $105, meaning you'll pay $
from here? i think we go higher. you look at a market environment where earnings are fine, we're stable, we think we'll hit 109, 110 bucks the is year. top line growth hasn't. we saw a little revenue growth which is good and the pushback on the macro it's not surprised it's bad. it will be bad through the end of the year. >> higher but not that much higher, i'm sensing you saying? we've been up 24% this year. we were up, what, 16, 17% last year. >> it's been multiple driven so 80% of returns this year have been a function of rerating of multiples. the question is, at a 15 times 14.5 times forward pe right now, do you think we're worth 15.5 or 16 next year? and then what are you playing on in earnings? people talking about an 1850 to 1950 s&p target are basically taking bottom up analysts outlook next year, 120 bucks, and slapping 16 plus on the multiple. >> richard, you were talking europe before europe was cool. >> yes. >> i hear more people talking europe these days. for 2014, do you think strategic investors should look at europe very closely and do you think european stocks as a gro
that across over a thousand locations, and they'll provide the same benefit to the environment as over 60,000 trees. that's a trend we can all get behind. >>> in less than 45 minutes the president is expected to speak out in defense of his health care law. we'll provide that live. this on a day that the from us frag frustrations of the obama care web glitches front and center on capitol hill with the appearance of health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius. bertha coombs joins us. >> 3 1/2 hours, that's how long the hearing went on. usually members of congress are determine shall to a sitting cabinet member. they were but they didn't pull any punches. the secretary came on the offense, starting with an apology, saying she's accountable for the website is not working but assuring she's working hard to win back america's confidence and it will be working by november 30 th. one of the most remarkable admissions she made when pressed by republican congress members about why she is not giving out enrollment numbers because right now she admitted she just doesn't trust the site's dat
. >> not be careful. i mean, it's a challenging environment and it's not just us. you can look at any food company that plays where we play and it's a tough environment. i think part of it it is changing eating habits and part of it is center of the store customers are challenged to some extent and these brand have been around a long, long time and we look for a steady performance in the long term. >> a lot of people don't understand the center store and they may not understand. the notion of a secular change. people snack more. you are moving aggressively in the snack food business including new products that we just got. greek yogurt bars. >> right. >> can you outrun the center of the store, can you explain that to us and go to the snacking section where things are much better? >> we already made a big move there. as you know, next year the snack part of the business will be 25% of sales so we've made a very significant move over to that, and we think that there's going to be organic growth and obviously growth from the acquisitions next year out of that. having said that, we're not forgetting j
, the financial reform, new regulatory environment, but that's all priced in, in our view. >> jim, i saw you tweeted out to your followers asking them what risks you think -- they think investors have missed the most. what did you find out? what did they tell you? >> well, one of the concerns that -- well i mean my followers are very concerned across the board in terms of what's going on in europe in terms of u.s. policy. one of the concerns i think a lot of investors have missed is the fact that some companies out there have focused on cost-cutting alone to boost their profits. in order to maintain this profit trajectory they need to focus on revenue growth. in particular, we've grown more cautious on the banks because regulatory costs are going up. and in terms of economic back drop, it's gotten a bit weaker. cost cutting can only get you so far. that's why the concern. >> erin, what about you in terms of revenue growth what are you seeing from this quarter? >> so, this quarter is actually pretty decent for revenue. next quarter is the big negative for banks. i think it's l
transaction environment. and our systems are expected to operate seamlessly. >> excellent. i want to tell everyone at home who is thinking about that, just remember, the smart investor tries to figure out a valuation and gets a good take away, they're going to do their part at the new york stock exchange to get that right. that's scott cutler, executive vice president and head of global listings at the nyse index. stay tuned. >>> coming up -- portfolio protector? cyber security concerns recently helped identity theft fighter life lock clinch a record quarter. is this stock strong enough to keep the bears from breaching its bottom line? don't miss cramer's take. ♪ ♪ stacy's mom has got it goin' on ♪ ♪ stacy's mom has got it goin' on ♪ ♪ stacy's mom has got it goin' on ♪ [ male announcer ] the beautifully practical and practically beautiful cadillac srx. get the best offers of the season now. lease this 2014 srx for around $369 a month with premium care maintenance included. ♪ i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical
to the environment as over 60,000 trees. that's a trend we can all get behind. the one drug testing people who get unemployment checks. we asked our esteemed colleagues here what they thought of all of this. this first one sort of says it all. and then there has to be responsibility of the recipients part. and yes, if you can afford drugs from you can afford to feed yourself not to pay for someone else's recreational drug use. don't forget, you can tweet us adeno kudo. but now we have a senator that says pushing the drug test is a good thing. we also have michelle phillips. how could this not be a good thing? >> i am all about being fiscally responsible and this is not a fiscally responsible policy. if you look at florida that implemented this, cost them only $100,000 and 2.6 people failed a drug test. but the problem is not welfare recipients being on drugs but the problem is the out of control spending and welfare. unfairly targeting poor people. neil: so they're the ones giving benefits mnemonics are the rightful people are getting a? >> tons of people receive taxpayer-funded programs. why are
difficult economic environment. the uk bank this morning, they are facing a 50 million pound uk regulators for failing to disclosure of its capital rate in qatar. they've confirmed that it's involved in another investigation as to whether there was any rigging of the currency markets, as well. but on the underlying basis -- i'm sorry, big jump in pretax profit, investors say up on the currency investigation is going to start wide bing. they're now launching their investigation themselves into what may or may not have gone on. quite how you read currency markets, i'm not sure. the flows are enormous. back to you guys. >> okay, ross, thank you. ross westgate. we will -- we won't see him again, will we? >> not this mortgage. we'll see him tomorrow morning. we did mention earlier, health care is going to away story today. secretary sa beale why testifying on capitol hill. and president obama speaking in boston. another story we'll be focused on this morning, the obama administration appears to have passed up offers for amazon and microsoft to help fix the government's healthcare.gov website b.
as though the environment is tough enough to come up with a different fund that fits a different profile of the pension funds. >> i think there's a big shift from defined benefit to defined contribution. making liquidity within the sector critical. by its liquid nature that's an illiquid asset. when you are moving into that side, you need to have different products available. >> what different products? i don't know what you mean when you say innovation. >> the majority of private equity firms are ten year funds. they invest and then divest over the remainder. the top funds still continue to raise that money. brand names, the top performing. if you're going to make an investment for ten years, you have to be sure that you're backing the top, top quality managers. the other managers that haven't had successful -- when i'm talking about successful, you're not in the top quarter. how are people innovating, deal by deal? they're raising money on a single deal going out to investors and raising money. you see the canadian pension funds, etc., building up that direct investment team to be able
environment. they all thought that the fed was going to act and that interest rates were going to go up. over the next year, that's going to happen, right? so to me, the real question is what happens when interest rates go up? they're going to continue to be aggressive. so me, the important question is, if interest rates are going up for the right robe, which is the economy is coming back and confidence is coming back, that means that they are going to be aggressive in going after growth. it's a whole game of confidence. it's coming back. >> and just quickly, you're not worried about there being a credit bubble? >> you never know whether you're in a bubble until the very end. that's the problem with bubbles. it goes back to the fundamentals of those companies. the corporate balance sheets are in great shape. is credit flowing to mid corporates, to small businesses, etcetera, etcetera, and the answer is probably not as much as we would like to see. so, look, i think like any of those credit bubble is in the past, we need to be extremely careful about those. we all need to be very cognizant tha
tested in a single environment. finally the system requires rapid development and release of hot fixes and patches so it is not always available or stable during the duration of the testing. secondly, the security contractor has not been able to test all security controls in one complete version of the system. if you look in the first part, which is most troubling at all, it says "due to system readiness issues, the security control assessment was only partly completed. this constitutes a risk that must be accepted before the marketplace day one operations." so let me tell you what you did. you allowed the system to go forward with no encryption on backup systems. they had no encryption on certain boundary crossings. you accepted a risk on behalf of every user of this computer that put their personal financial information at risk because you did not even have the most basic end-to-end test on security of the system. amazon would never do this. proflowers would never do this. kayak would never do this. this is completely an unsearchabunsearch ab -- unacceptable level of security. and we
in an environment where you've got such easy money from the fed, is that right? >> absolutely. we have easy money all around the world, not only the fed but also in europe eurozone and japan. japan has been a big entrant to that. >> do valuations not counter into a decision on when to put money into equities right now? do you worry about valuations even though this market is going up on all of this easy money, as you say? >> yeah. valuations are high, particularly in small caps and in some of the consumer cyclicals. there are still areas for relative value. and i think there's still room for further margin expansion as we look sfwardforward into the future as we keep the asset bubble going. >> nathan? >> i see it that we're in a trading range. we're range-bound. most rallies start at about 11 on an p.e. and end or die around 19 or 20. when you see the 16 or 17 the hard part is that we're halfway between where we've been and where we're likely to go. and absent news like -- we didn't have any great news today so everybody looks around. now is a time to check your strategy. i
. if you start worrying about a deflationary environment, revenue would be one of the places you would see that. >> our friend mr. bernanke, his whole academic history and career has been built on as you know deflation in the u.s. and in japan. >> yeah. >> and what you had there was ha supply-induced deflation morphing into a demand shortfall deflation. supply induced is where you have asia, where you have technology, where you have globalization causing the decline in prices. it's similar to the united states from 1871 to 1896. 25 years, the prices declined in the united states by 1.5% per year. that is a good kind of deflation. there's pernicious deflation, which is when you have demand shortfall. and a couple goes into a department store and say let's buy a refrigerator, one spouse says let's wait, they go back a year later it's 10% cheaper and they say let's wait again. that's the kind that janet yellen, ben bernanke are worried about. >> you're going with -- >> bernanke. >> you're with the bernanke pronouncer. >> as a southerner, as a tennessee boy and he's a south carolina boy. >> is
and the broader business environment. >> it was lacking is enough confidence to take risk toes create jobs. i think that's the big issue here. but people are maximizing what they have. they're not doing a lot of new things. so for aig, we continue to grow. we continue to grow across the board, both in the united states and around the world. but it's a matter of our clients are a little bit more cautious. but i don't know that this quarter or next quarter that you'll see any effect on our business materially. >> and stores products retailer container store, they raised $225 million. the ipo was priced at $18 a share, the top end of its increased price range. stairs are set to start trading on the new york stock exchange today under the symbol tcs. >>> microsoft co-founder paul allen's fund is suggesting microsoft spin off its consumer business. this is big news. the man who manages allen's fortune is now suggesting that microsoft search and xbox business res deextracting from the software business which drives earnings. so i mean, paul allen and bill gates, i don't think they're -- they've bee
environment where a lot of people are rooting for your failure. >> that's all the time we have. jason furman, chairman of the council of economic advisers or, as you said, the president's top economic adviser. >> thanks, steve liesman. let's check in with dominic chu. >> check out shares of spirit aerosystem, a major supplier of components to boeing and airbus, it reports a 10% rise in sales due to strong demand for large commercial aircraft. they expect demand to double to more than $2 trillion over the next 20 years. spirit aero also benefiting from reining in those costs. >> usage of facebooks among u.s. teens overall was stable but we did see a decrease in daily users specifically among younger teens. >> well, a 13-year-old penned this op-ed back in august titgtd "i'm 13 and none of my friends use facebook." she'll join us to tell us why facebook is not appealing to her and her friends. >> many yachts are going high tech. we'll show you lights controlled with an ipad, boats in a steer themselves and of course retractable flat screens. we'll tell you about all the latest gadgets on mega y
. and sisco, the one with an "s," not the "c." reported a penny above estimates, the market environment was challenging for the customers during the course of the quarter. >> i find that so confusing. someone should change. >> all right. let's -- >> let's make it easier. >> let's get back to our guest host jim bullard. were we done with our inflation conversation? people got kind of -- a lot of people are tweeting about it and talking about that now. have you always -- have you changed recently and become even -- this is almost like a new theory that you have at this point, i think. don't we always think it's different this time? i mean, volcker had to come in and save this, uyou know, save the entire world because we let it get out of control last time. i'm talking about inflation. >> i think it could happen again and i have been worried about it. yeah, absolutely. >> there's global deflationary forces that have given you guys cover. >> yes, global deflationary forces. what is going on? what's driving that deflationary process. i think that's been -- >> what -- >> low inflationary. >>
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)